Africans Must Focus on What Unites Them Not What Separates Them

発行済み
2019年09月05日
2019
シェア

Oliver Cann, Public Engagement, Tel.: +41 79 799 3405; Email: oliver.cann@weforum.org

· Free trade must be accompanied by the free movement of people

· Leaders at all levels must work on rebuilding social cohesion in African countries

· The rapid advances in technology bring huge opportunities but also risks

· Follow the 2019 World Economic Forum on Africa at http://wef.ch/af19

Cape Town, South Africa, 5 September 2019 – The majority of South Africans are appalled at the attacks on African migrants and refugees in the country by South Africans, said its Finance Minister Tito Mboweni at the opening plenary of the World Economic Forum on Africa.

"We welcome all Africans who have come to this conference; we welcome all Africans who live in South Africa. We are all Africans. We need to tell our people that what they are doing is wrong. These artificial barriers we have created and the hatred among ourselves must really become a thing of the past,” he said.

Responding to a question about the African Continental Free Trade Area, Mboweni said if Africa wants the free movement of goods, it also needs to ensure the free movement of people. “If free movement is supposed to happen, one cannot be in a position where you allow this person and not the other.”

Mboweni was standing in for Cyril Ramaphosa, President of South Africa, who was at Parliament to address protestors demanding action from the government on violence against women. Elsie Kanza, Head of Africa at the World Economic Forum, said that addressing systemic violence against women is a top priority for the meeting and she urged all leaders to act against the problem.

Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations, said leaders at all levels, not just at the political level, must “dig deep to bring back social cohesion. We need to look at what binds us and not what separates us.”

Speaking on the issue of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, Mohammed said that, while advances in technology are exciting, “the picture has shadows as well as light.”

Mohammed said technology is moving faster than the world’s ability to manage its impact and it is adding to the uncertainty of a world already unsettled by challenges such as climate change. “If governments cannot proactively manage the impacts, it will make our growth less inclusive with severe security implications.” Partnerships will be critical in addressing the challenges emerging from this new world.

Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, said the rapid pace of technology requires renewed frameworks for cooperation to be developed to deliver an inclusive and sustainable future for Africa.

“Africa cannot afford to be left behind. The Fourth Industrial Revolution can solve many of the issues that came with the first, second and third industrial revolutions. It is a catalyst for Africa to leapfrog into the 21st century,” said Schwab.

Cyril M. Ramaphosa, President of South Africa, in remarks read on his behalf by Mboweni, said Africa, along with the rest of the world, is dealing with the same question: how to harness the potential of the Fourth Industrial Revolution in pursuit of development and economic growth. “And importantly, how to ensure that, as we take this quantum leap into the future, we do not leave society’s most marginalized behind."

“Disruptive trends and technologies are changing the way we live, the way we work and do business, and the way we govern. We must respond with agility to craft a roadmap for navigating this new environment. We must ensure that our citizens are prepared, and, if necessary, that they are shielded from any adverse consequences. Our response must be collaborative, multisectoral and inclusive,” said Ramaphosa.

Ramaphosa said South Africa is not only working with its neighbours to develop a continental strategy led by the African Telecommunications Union, but it has also established a Presidential Commission on the Fourth Industrial Revolution to position the country as a competitive global player in this new space.

Three new Forum initiatives were also announced at the plenary session: platforms dealing with youth and employment, risk resilience and e-commerce.

The 2019 World Economic Forum on Africa takes place 4-6 September in Cape Town, South Africa, under the theme Shaping Inclusive Growth and Shared Futures in the Fourth Industrial Revolution. The meeting convenes more than 1,000 regional and global leaders from government, business, civil society and academia. This gathering explores new models to help Africa achieve success at a time when technology is creating dramatic economic and societal shifts. The meeting’s highly interactive programme also covers issues as diverse as skills and education, the ocean economy, the economic impact of drones, free trade and e-commerce.

The Co-Chairs of the 2019 World Economic on Africa are Ellen Agler, Chief Executive Officer, The END Fund, USA; Jeremy Farrar, Director, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom; Arancha Gonzalez Laya, Executive Director, International Trade Centre (ITC), Geneva; André Hoffmann, Vice-Chairman, Roche, Switzerland; Alex Liu, Managing Partner and Chairman, A. T. Kearney, USA; and Sipho M. Pityana, Chairman, AngloGold Ashanti, South Africa.

Notes to editors

Follow the 2019 World Economic Forum on Africa at http://wef.ch/af19

Use the meeting hashtag: #af19

Read the Meeting Overview

View the best Forum Flickr photos at http://wef.ch/pix

Watch live webcasts of sessions at http://wef.ch/live

Become a fan of the Forum on Facebook at http://wef.ch/facebook

Follow the Forum on Instagram at http://wef.ch/instagram and on LinkedIn at http://wef.ch/linkedin

Follow the Forum on Twitter at http://wef.ch/twitter and http://wef.ch/livetweet
Read our blogs at http://wef.ch/africablogs19

View upcoming Forum events at http://wef.ch/events

Subscribe to Forum news releases at http://wef.ch/news

すべての意見は、著者によるものです。世界経済フォーラムは、独立かつ中立なプラットホームとして、​グーロバル、地域、産業のアジェンダを形成する話題に関わる議論の場を提供しています。